FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 1, 2021
Sean Sibley
media@peters.senate.gov

 DETROIT, MI –U.S. Senator Gary Peters (MI) released a video commemorating Manufacturing Day, which is today October 1st, and recognized Michigan manufacturers and workers:

“I believe strongly that you can’t be a great country if you don’t actually make things,” said Senator Peters, member of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee.“In the United States and in Michigan, our tradition of building things has transformed society across generations – and I’m working to make sure we can continue to be a global manufacturing leader.”

“For instance, I helped secure funding so we can make more semiconductor chips here in the United States instead of relying on foreign production,” Peters continued. “I also secured a provision in the Senate-passed bipartisan infrastructure bill to strengthen Buy American requirements – which ensure that the federal government uses American-made products to create American jobs and support American companies and American workers. I’ll keep working on legislation to support workers and manufacturers, and to make sure your voices are heard in Washington.”

Peters has made strengthening domestic manufacturing a top priority. The Senate last night unanimously passed Peters’ bipartisan legislation to revamp the Manufacturing.gov website to serve as a one-stop hub to better connect manufacturers with federal manufacturing programs and resources. He also has championed a provision included in the Senate-passed bipartisan infrastructure bill that passed in August to strengthen Buy American requirements and close loopholes to ensure that the federal government uses taxpayer dollars to invest in American manufacturers, by purchasing American-made products and helping to create good-paying jobs for American workers.

He also led efforts that passed in June as part of the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act to promote domestic production of personal protective equipment and strengthen the Manufacturing Extension Partnership to boost small- and medium-sized manufacturers. Peters also secured funding in the bill to expand domestic production of mature semiconductor chips. The shortage of these semiconductors resulted in massive supply chain disruptions and idled auto plants across the country – including in Michigan. The competitiveness bill also included Peters’ bipartisan legislation to revive and elevate the National Manufacturing Advisory Council. The Council advises the federal government on manufacturing programs and provides private-sector guidance and insight to the federal government, but it has only met intermittently in recent years. Peters’ legislation would establish the council as a critical component in federal manufacturing policy and strategy.

Well before the pandemic reinforced the urgent need for the U.S. to bolster American manufacturing and supply chains, Peters proposed creating a National Institute of Manufacturing [peters.senate.gov] to streamline federal manufacturing efforts and better address both short-term supply chain issues and longer-term problems related to a lack of a national manufacturing strategy. He reintroduced that bill earlier this year [peters.senate.gov].

Click here for video of his remarks and below is the text as delivered:

“Hello Michigan, and happy Manufacturing Day!

 “I want to first say thank you to all of the engineers, welders, autoworkers, and workers all across our state who keep our state at the forefront of innovation. You all play a critical role in our state’s economic success – and have been absolutely essential to ensuring that we can get through and emerge even stronger from this pandemic.

 “I believe strongly that you can’t be a great country if you don’t actually make things. In the United States and in Michigan, our tradition of building things has transformed society across generations – and I’m working to make sure we can continue to be a global manufacturing leader.

 “This is about not only our economic competitiveness and creating more good-paying jobs and opportunity for our workers, but also our national security.

 “For instance, I helped secure funding so we can make more semiconductor chips here in the United States instead of relying on foreign production. These chips are essential to manufacturing other products, like cars, and a domestic supply will mean we can avoid future shortages and disruptions.

 “I also secured a provision in the Senate-passed bipartisan infrastructure bill to strengthen Buy American requirements – which ensure that the federal government uses American-made products to create American jobs and support American companies and American workers.

 “But supporting manufacturers also requires putting in place a coherent, national manufacturing strategy. And that’s why I proposed creating a National Institute of Manufacturing. The institute will serve as the hub for federal manufacturing programs, consolidate existing manufacturing efforts and make it easier for small businesses to secure federal support. It will promote efforts to close the skills gap in our workforce, and help manufacturers adapt to a changing, 21st century global marketplace.

 “I’ll keep working on legislation to support workers and manufacturers, and to make sure that your voices are heard in Washington.

 “So to all Michigan workers: thank you for all you do to keep our state – and nation – on the cutting-edge.”

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